tacticals:

Having the right gear is key to a successful field operation, however having the right way to keep the gear organized is sometimes more important.

I have a system for packing my gear and I always pack my kit the same way. I know where everything is and I can access all the different pieces of my kit under stress if needed.

One of the best ways to keep gear organized is the use of pouches or pockets.

Enter the GORUCK Field Pockets

minimalmac:

So, I ended up acquiring one of the ChargeKey Lightning-to-USB cables that I reblogged a few days ago. And, I have to say it is a handy little thing to have. I have used it at least once a day since I received it.

There are many times when I’m on the go with nothing more than my iPhone and, due to the day, I find myself in need of a quick charge. I have a USB power adapter in my car but usually not a cable with me. Well, now I do. It adds no more bulk than another key would on a keyring and is just as light. It appears to be pretty durable as well, And though the Lightning and USB plugs have been stripped to the bare essentials, they connect firmly when plugged in. They also sell a USB-to-Micro USB version for you users of, well, non-Apple made phones and devices.

No matter what, this is a neat idea and useful thing and well worth a look.

Packing light and going fast.

Q

airzona asked:

I'm going to Europe this summer for study abroad: 2 weeks around Eastern Europe by rail ending Turkey for 7 weeks, and 2 weeks in France. I own a GR1, can I pack enough for most three months abroad?

A

Maybe.  Traveling for one week and three months isn’t all that different.  There are only so many things you actually “need” to survive.  Will you be washing your own clothing somewhat often?  Do you mind wearing the same clothing for a few days in a row?  Will you be buying or collecting things while traveling that you’ll need to carry with you? 

Start by looking at this in the reverse of how you asked the question.  Rather than ask, I own a GR1, can I fit everything into it?  Ask the question, I have this much stuff that I need to bring with me, does it fit into my GR1?  

Packing should be an inside out process.  We have items, X, Y, and Z that we need to bring with us.  How big are they?  While we’re there we want to buy items A, B, and Z.  How big are they?  Does the combined volume of items A, B, C, X, Y, and Z fit into the GR1 or shall I choose another bag?

If you figure out what you’re bringing and you want to share it with everyone send us a picture and a description and we’ll consider sharing here.  

- Sam at Packlite

A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.
A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog. 

FX Pace Counter
No Ranger Beads required.
For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:
Sharp Knife
7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
Lighter
Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.
Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.
Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.
Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.
Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.
Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.
Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.

A unique take on Ranger Beads from the snakedrblog

FX Pace Counter

No Ranger Beads required.

For this FX (field expedient) project you need the following:

  • Sharp Knife
  • 7ft Cord (ideally 550 Paracord)
  • Lighter

Cut the cord into two lengths measuring 4ft and 3ft.

Fold the 3ft length in half and measure 6 inches from the loop.

Tie an overhand knot at the 6 inch mark then a second overhand knot 6 inches down - you will have two overhand knots evenly spaced 6 inches apart.

Now gut the 4ft length of cord and cut into 13 pieces each measuring 4 inches. These will be used as the pace counters.

Loop and secure 4 pace counters between the first overhand knot and loop and 9 pace counters between the two overhand knots.

Caution: Take care when melting the paracord as it can cause burn injuries.

Tip: When melting the cord use the side of the lighter to extinguish the flame and apply slight pressure to flatten the end. This will also secure the pace counter.

An Early, Light Traveler?

"…while Bento packed the remaining things he owned - two pairs of trousers, one pair of shoes with straps of brass, three shirts, two white collars, underwear, a pipe and tobacco - into a large bag he intended to take along. The bag didn’t weigh much and Bento was satisfied to own just a little. If he didn’t have the bed and the books he would be free as a nomad."

Irwin D. Yalom in "The Spinoza Problem" about Baruch Spinoza (1632 - 1677) a philosopher and liberal thinker.

samh:

I carry my keys on a small ‘biner hung off my belt loop.  This provides easy access to the keys even when seated and since I require quite a few keys also helps in reducing bulk in my pocket.  

The downside to a ‘biner is the slight risk of a keyring escaping and those keys being lost.  This has happened to me only once in the past decade I’ve used this system but it was enough to require a solution.

Using a short piece of gutted 550 cord I tied it in such a way as to create two loops.  These loops are threaded onto the ‘biner in such a way as to create a secure space for the keyrings.  In order to remove a keyring one of the loops of cord can be slid upward and off the ‘biner.

All-in-all I’m very happy with the security and performance of this system. 

A Week Away, or 2 Months Abroad

I get everything I need into these two bags. (Well, the surfboard is a little hard to fit actually).

The bag on the left is an Osprey Porter 46, and I can get all my clothes and personal belongings for a week in Vegas (heading there right now), or 2 months in Bali (just got back in January).

The second bag is my Domke F2. It’s old school. It fits all three of my cameras (those are old school too - I still shoot film). I can also slip my macbook air and my ipad in the side pouch too.


Submitted by William Bay

Q

buasato asked:

Do you have the 32 liter kit bag by goruck? How does it compare to the original gr1 (with the mesh inner pocket instead of cordura) in terms of what it can carry?

A

I own both a GR1 and a 32L Kit Bag, they work great together for traveling.  If I’m packing as light as possible I bring just the GR1 but if I need to bring along anything extra or if I plan to bring home items I pick up while traveling I bring both bags.  The 32L Kit Bag is perfect for overhead compartments on an airplane as it is so much smaller than most people’s overhead bags that it will fit into the smallest available spaces which is often a headache of airline travel.

Your question was specific to the mesh pockets inside these bags however.  There is one mesh pocket in the GR1 that is sized approximately 10” x 12”.  The 32L Kit Bag has two pockets sized approximately 6” x 8”.  In terms of sheer storage area that is a comparison of 120 sq. in. (774 sq. cm) vs. 96 sq. in. (619 sq. cm) which means the GR1 will hold “more stuff” and is also capable of carrying “bigger stuff”.  The Kit Bag however has two pockets, one on either side of the bag, so it’s advantage is more organizational options and multiple access points.  

I hope I have answered your question thoroughly.  Thanks for reading Packlite.    

In an effort to provide full disclosure I am only one of the contributors to Packlite so my opinion may not represent all of us.  I also need to mention that I am employed full time by GORUCK in our R&D facility.  I had the enjoyable opportunity to provide design and construction advice in the creation of the 32L Kit Bag. Although I feel the information provided above is accurate, fair, and objective I do feel it is necessary to make it known I may have bias to our products.  - Sam