muddybadger:

Cadre Dookie dancing like nobody’s watchin

Packing light for alpine climbing. Back in 2011.

Sorry for the low quality pics. Packing light for alpine climbing. Back in 2011.

Sorry for the low quality pics.

Packing light for alpine climbing. Back in 2011.

Sorry for the low quality pics.

A little bit of history. The 9/11/11 NYC GORUCK Challenge.

I did my second Challenge then and shadowed Jason as well. Back then the Challenge was sort of a mystery.

Mystery Ranch 3 Zipper line.

I had the chance to test the ASAP and for a quick and dirty outings and packing light is a great pack.
I still prefer the GR0 for much of what I need, but sometimes is good to have different options.

Ready. Gear and clothing for 4 days in my GORUCK GR0.

More details soon.

My day hiking gear is always evolving, as, I think, it should be.  I find that regularly asking myself what’s needed for a safe, fun adventure out in the woods—whether spring or fall, solo or with a companion, on a familiar trail or somewhere completely new, for two miles or for ten—has two benefits beyond simply being a fun, ongoing challenge.

The first is this: it keeps me in the present—alert, aware of my surroundings, and appreciating all that the woods have to offer.  The second is that it ensures I know not only what I have with me, but also where it is and how to use it.  For a visual depiction of how my day hiking gear has changed over the past seven months, see here and here.  I anticipate it changing again soon, though on a smaller scale, as I’m quite happy with the lightweight and versatile set-up I currently have.

I’m a college English teacher and a creative writing workshop leader by trade.  I often tell my students that the best, most effective, most downright moving writers are those who allow self-reflection to guide them in their work.  Perhaps the same can be said of hikers.


Submitted by Erin. Thank you.

Don’t be that person. Pack light and go fast.

muddybadger:

Cadre Dan has been saying for years that GORUCK’s main goal is to build better Americans. And he’s been right for years. This means it’s the job of our Cadre to teach you what they’ve learned in training and in war, and to make sure that you “get it.”

GORUCK Expeditions (Trek, Navigator, Beached, and Ascent) are what military folks would call “gentleman’s courses” (yes, open to women, too). This means the physical challenges are secondary to the mental and academic challenges and our Cadre focus on teaching tangible skills such as mission planning, constructing survival shelters, and interrogation techniques, depending on the event. After instruction and hands-on practice, you and your small team will then face a simulated “worst-case scenario” final exercise, where you will apply what you’ve learned. There’s some healthy competition because competition encourages performance, and performance under a little bit of stress means that you walk away from your Expedition with the confidence in knowing that if you had to survive a real life worst-case scenario, you could do it. And of course it pays to be a winner.

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Mystery Ranch IFAK